Friday, August 21, 2015

Fired in Kansas for Not Heeding a Call to Prayer?

A former employee of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach has filed suit against the Office for being fired for not attended church services enough. That kind of firing is pretty unusual for a government office, I would think, it's just that, where Kansas is concerned...I tend to believe it.


It's not just that KS Governor, Sam Brownback, is a pretty notorious hardcore Christian with a disregard for notions of separation of church and state. It's that using religion as a litmus test for establishing that one is the right kind of people goes with some of the voter discrimination nonsense that Kris Kobach has become known for (he calls it anti-fraud--I'm pretty sure making sure the "right people" are voting comes with very definite ideas about who the "right people" are).

Kris Kobach has "scare quoted" religious organizations that have opposite views than his about his particular crusade--as if he doesn't think they're quite Christian enough if they don't share his views. So why not show employment discrimination as well?

(It sort of reminds me of that Bush Administration hiring scandal involving Monica Goodling. It's very ideological and not very appropriate.)

2 comments:

Formerly Amherst said...

Well, little lady, you dag-nab Yankees up there with your Atlantic Monthly and John Cheever and John Updike just don't understand the true sons and daughters of the South.

Hi Vixen, I believe you are correct that this is in part a ploy by Bobby Jindal to elevate his presidential possibilities.

What I'm not sure you get is that most of the constituents of Louisiana are more or less in agreement with him.

Again and again I see the disconnect between the eastern seaboard and west coast on the one hand and flyover country on the other. For some reason people on the eastern seaboard think that because they feel a certain way, that must mean it is right. (I used to feel this way, but I don't so much anymore.) The South and Southwest have a different sensibility, a different outlook and a different perspective.

In states like LA (heavily Catholic) giving birth is often regarded as a Sacred process. This is deeply ingrained even among non-religious people. Of course you can find those with a different perspective, but they are not in the majority.

Ultimately this is a metaphysical issue. We come from somewhere unknown and then go back to somewhere unknown. There are those who know the answers to these questions but they are completely ignored by both religious and secular complements alike.

So people are left with hypotheses that conform to their own biases. For example, you offer the “toe” hypothesis. Not a bad speculation, but hardly sufficient to lay down the law to those who disagree with the “toe” hypothesis.

Humanoids are strange creatures. People like to go into politics so they can have the power to force other people to do what they want. And for some reason people who feel certain ways in one region of the country think they should have the right to tell other regions with entirely different histories how they should feel and what they should do about metaphysical matters that they can only guess at.

How could trouble possibly come from that?

I think it would be a good idea to let each state determine these matters for themselves in concert with their own histories, and sensibilities. Bobby Jindal will not be hurt by this in Louisiana, and he will not be hurt among conservatives. Eastern seaboard liberals will not like him, but they don't like him already.

Maravantara gives rise to pralaya, and the aeonian cycle continues without end. Only those who are consolidated in a higher state of consciousness are immune to its vicissitudes.

Formerly Amherst said...

Whoops! I accidentally posted this on the wrong thread. Obviously, it was supposed to go on the Bobby Jindal thread. My apologies.